trigger
finger

Table of Contents

What is trigger finger?

Trigger finger, or stenosing tenosynovitis, is an inflammatory condition affecting a tendon in your finger. It’s easy to recognize trigger finger because one of your fingers becomes fixed in a bent position. In some cases, your finger can become locked in this position.The symptoms of trigger finger vary from mild to severe. It’s also common for them to progress over time.

If you have trigger finger, you might experience:

  • A clicking or popping sensation when moving your finger
  • Tenderness or a bump at the base of the affected finger
  • Finger stiffness, especially upon waking
  • A finger that locks or catches in a bent position
 

You can develop trigger finger with any finger, even your thumb. It’s also possible to have it in multiple fingers at once as well as both hands.

What causes trigger finger?

Tendons attach muscles to bone. They’re covered by a protective covering. When this outer sheath grows irritated or inflamed, it disrupts the tendon’s ability to glide smoothly. Over time, this irritation can lead to thickening or bump formations in the tendon, cause scar tissue to develop, and significantly affect the movement of your tendon.

Several factors increase your risk of trigger finger, including:

  • Being a woman
  • Repetitive hand use and gripping
  • Certain health conditions, like diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis


Undergoing certain hand surgeries, like carpal tunnel release, can also increase your chances of trigger finger.

Trigger finger treatment?

Your surgeon at Arizona Center for Hand to Shoulder Surgery develops a trigger finger treatment strategy based on the severity of your symptoms and the extent of your condition.

Common trigger finger treatment includes:

  • Anti-inflammatory medications
  • Rest and avoiding activities that aggravate your condition
  • Splinting at night to rest the tendon
  • Gentle stretching exercises to regain mobility in your finger

For severe symptoms that don’t respond to conservative treatments, your surgeon might recommend steroid injections targeting your tendon sheath, percutaneous release to remove tendon constriction or surgery.

If you’re suffering from the symptoms of trigger finger, contact Arizona Center for Hand to Shoulder Surgery for a consultation. Their caring staff will be honored to take care of you.

learn about our amazing team of medical professionals. Our team consists of orthopedists, hand specialist, shoulder specialist, and sports medicine doctors. click the link and find the right provider for you.

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